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Curr Pharm Des. 2017;23(41):6347-6357. doi: 10.2174/1381612823666170510124348.

Modulation of Inflammatory Response to Implanted Biomaterials Using Natural Compounds.

Author information

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States.
2
Biomedical Engineering Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, United States.
3
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia SC, 29209, United States.

Abstract

Tissue engineering offers a promising strategy to restore injuries resulting from trauma, infection, tumor resection, or other diseases. In spite of significant progress, the field faces a significant bottleneck; the critical need to understand and exploit the interdependencies of tissue healing, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Inherently, the balance of these interacting processes is affected by a number of injury site conditions that represent a departure from physiological environment, including reduced pH, increased concentration of free radicals, hypoglycemia, and hypoxia. Efforts to harness the potential of immune response as a therapeutic strategy to promote tissue repair have led to identification of natural compounds with significant anti-inflammatory properties. This article provides a concise review of the body's inflammatory response to biomaterials and describes the role of oxygen as a physiological cue in this process. We proceed to highlight the potential of natural compounds to mediate inflammatory response and improve host-graft integration. Herein, we discuss the use of natural compounds to map signaling molecules and checkpoints that regulate the cross-linkage of immune response and skeletal repair.

KEYWORDS:

Inflammatory response; angiogenesis; biomaterials; macrophages; natural compounds.; tissue engineering

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