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Public Health. 2017 Aug;149:11-20. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2017.04.007. Epub 2017 May 15.

Does a video displaying a stair climbing model increase stair use in a worksite setting?

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Vancalsterlisa@gmail.com.
2
Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: AnnSophie.VanHoecke@faber.kuleuven.be.
3
Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.
4
Department of Kinesiology, KU Leuven, Tervuursevest 101, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: Filip.Boen@faber.kuleuven.be.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study evaluated the effects of improving the visibility of the stairwell and of displaying a video with a stair climbing model on climbing and descending stair use in a worksite setting.

STUDY DESIGN:

Intervention study.

METHODS:

Three consecutive one-week intervention phases were implemented: (1) the visibility of the stairs was improved by the attachment of pictograms that indicated the stairwell; (2) a video showing a stair climbing model was sent to the employees by email; and (3) the same video was displayed on a television screen at the point-of-choice (POC) between the stairs and the elevator. The interventions took place in two buildings. The implementation of the interventions varied between these buildings and the sequence was reversed.

RESULTS:

Improving the visibility of the stairs increased both stair climbing (+6%) and descending stair use (+7%) compared with baseline. Sending the video by email yielded no additional effect on stair use. By contrast, displaying the video at the POC increased stair climbing in both buildings by 12.5% on average. One week after the intervention, the positive effects on stair climbing remained in one of the buildings, but not in the other.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that improving the visibility of the stairwell and displaying a stair climbing model on a screen at the POC can result in a short-term increase in both climbing and descending stair use.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioural modelling; Choice behaviour; Health promotion; Intervention study; Stair use; Worksite setting

PMID:
28521189
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2017.04.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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