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Neuron. 2017 May 17;94(4):908-919.e7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2017.04.040.

Distinct Sources of Deterministic and Stochastic Components of Action Timing Decisions in Rodent Frontal Cortex.

Author information

1
Champalimaud Research, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, 1400-038 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: masayoshi.murakami@neuro.fchampalimaud.org.
2
The Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401 Jerusalem, Israel.
3
The Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Brain Sciences, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401 Jerusalem, Israel; Department of Neurobiology, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences and the Federmann Center for the Study of Rationality, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 9190401 Jerusalem, Israel.
4
Champalimaud Research, Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown, 1400-038 Lisbon, Portugal. Electronic address: zmainen@neuro.fchampalimaud.org.

Abstract

The selection and timing of actions are subject to determinate influences such as sensory cues and internal state as well as to effectively stochastic variability. Although stochastic choice mechanisms are assumed by many theoretical models, their origin and mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we investigated this issue by studying how neural circuits in the frontal cortex determine action timing in rats performing a waiting task. Electrophysiological recordings from two regions necessary for this behavior, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and secondary motor cortex (M2), revealed an unexpected functional dissociation. Both areas encoded deterministic biases in action timing, but only M2 neurons reflected stochastic trial-by-trial fluctuations. This differential coding was reflected in distinct timescales of neural dynamics in the two frontal cortical areas. These results suggest a two-stage model in which stochastic components of action timing decisions are injected by circuits downstream of those carrying deterministic bias signals.

PMID:
28521140
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2017.04.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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