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CJEM. 2017 May 17:1-10. doi: 10.1017/cem.2017.24. [Epub ahead of print]

Simulation in Canadian postgraduate emergency medicine training - a national survey.

Author information

1
*Queen's University School of Medicine,Kingston,ON.
2
†Department of Emergency Medicine,Queen's University, Kingston,ON.
3
§Department of Medicine,St. Michael's Hospital,University of Toronto,Toronto,ON.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Simulation-based education (SBE) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCPC-EM residency programs across Canada.

METHODS:

A national survey was administered to residents and knowledgeable program representatives (PRs) at all Canadian FRCPC-EM programs. Survey question themes included simulation program characteristics, the frequency of resident participation, the location and administration of SBE, institutional barriers, interprofessional involvement, content, assessment strategies, and attitudes about SBE.

RESULTS:

Resident and PR response rates were 63% (203/321) and 100% (16/16), respectively. Residents reported a median of 20 (range 0-150) hours of annual simulation training, with 52% of residents indicating that the time dedicated to simulation training met their needs. PRs reported the frequency of SBE sessions ranging from weekly to every 6 months, with 15 (94%) programs having an established simulation curriculum. Two (13%) of the programs used simulation for resident assessment, although 15 (94%) of PRs indicated that they would be comfortable with simulation-based assessment. The most common PR-identified barriers to administering simulation were a lack of protected faculty time (75%) and a lack of faculty experience with simulation (56%). Interprofessional involvement in simulation was strongly valued by both residents and PRs.

CONCLUSIONS:

SBE is frequently used by Canadian FRCPC-EM residency programs. However, there exists considerable variability in the structure, frequency, and timing of simulation-based activities. As programs transition to competency-based medical education, national organizations and collaborations should consider the variability in how SBE is administered.

KEYWORDS:

emergency medicine; manikins; medical education; postgraduate; simulation; survey

PMID:
28511730
DOI:
10.1017/cem.2017.24
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