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Br J Radiol. 2017 Aug;90(1076):20170198. doi: 10.1259/bjr.20170198. Epub 2017 Jun 16.

18F-FDG PET/CT in polymyalgia rheumatica-a pictorial review.

Author information

1
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Center, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic.
2
2 Regional Center for Applied Molecular Oncology (RECAMO), Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic.
3
Department of Comprehensive Cancer Care, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
4
4 Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Brno and Masaryk University , Brno, Czech Republic.
5
5 Department of Radiation Oncology, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
6
6 Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal Medicine-Hematology and Oncology, University Hospital Brno and Faculty of Medicine, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
7
7 Department of Anatomy, University Hospital Brno and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.
8
8 Rheumatology Unit, 2nd Department of Internal Medicine, St Anne's University Hospital Brno and Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic.

Abstract

Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) is one of the inflammatory rheumatic diseases that can potentially be detected by positron emission tomography/CT. High fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) accumulation around the shoulders, sternoclavicular and hip joints are the most common pre-treatment features of patients with PMR. Another common sign is increased 18F-FDG uptake in extra-articular regions between columnal spinous processes, near ischial tuberosities and in the praepubic area. Some patients also present with high 18F-FDG uptake in main arteries, corresponding to the characteristics of giant cell arteritis. It is possible to observe a decrease or even a disappearance of 18F-FDG uptake after effective therapy, an event which may be useful for the monitoring of treatment as well as for detection of PMR relapse.

PMID:
28508663
PMCID:
PMC5603955
DOI:
10.1259/bjr.20170198
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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