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Am J Clin Dermatol. 2017 Oct;18(5):663-679. doi: 10.1007/s40257-017-0285-x.

The Role of Micronutrients in Alopecia Areata: A Review.

Author information

1
Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, 02903, USA.
2
Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, Quinnipiac University, North Haven, CT, 06473, USA.
3
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, 339 Eddy Street, Providence, RI, 02903, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI, 02903, USA.
5
Department of Dermatology, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, 339 Eddy Street, Providence, RI, 02903, USA. eunyoung_cho@brown.edu.
6
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Brown University, Providence, RI, 02903, USA. eunyoung_cho@brown.edu.

Abstract

Alopecia areata (AA) is a common, non-scarring form of hair loss caused by immune-mediated attack of the hair follicle. As with other immune-mediated diseases, a complex interplay between environment and genetics is thought to lead to the development of AA. Deficiency of micronutrients such as vitamins and minerals may represent a modifiable risk factor associated with development of AA. Given the role of these micronutrients in normal hair follicle development and in immune cell function, a growing number of investigations have sought to determine whether serum levels of these nutrients might differ in AA patients, and whether supplementation of these nutrients might represent a therapeutic option for AA. While current treatment often relies on invasive steroid injections or immunomodulating agents with potentially harmful side effects, therapy by micronutrient supplementation, whether as a primary modality or as adjunctive treatment, could offer a promising low-risk alternative. However, our review highlights a need for further research in this area, given that the current body of literature largely consists of small case-control studies and case reports, which preclude any definite conclusions for a role of micronutrients in AA. In this comprehensive review of the current literature, we found that serum vitamin D, zinc, and folate levels tend to be lower in patients with AA as compared to controls. Evidence is conflicting or insufficient to suggest differences in levels of iron, vitamin B12, copper, magnesium, or selenium. A small number of studies suggest that vitamin A levels may modify the disease. Though understanding of the role for micronutrients in AA is growing, definitive clinical recommendations such as routine serum level testing or therapeutic supplementation call for additional studies in larger populations and with a prospective design.

KEYWORDS:

Alopecia Areata; Calcipotriol; Hair Loss; Serum Zinc Level; Squaric Acid

PMID:
28508256
PMCID:
PMC5685931
DOI:
10.1007/s40257-017-0285-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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