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Development. 2017 Jun 15;144(12):2212-2221. doi: 10.1242/dev.148080. Epub 2017 May 15.

FGF signaling refines Wnt gradients to regulate the patterning of taste papillae.

Author information

1
Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.
2
Institute of Molecular Genetics of the CAS, v. v. i., Czech Centre for Phenogenomics and Laboratory of Transgenic Models of Diseases, Division BIOCEV, Prumyslova 595, Vestec 252 42, Czech Republic.
3
Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 56, Helsinki FIN-00014, Finland.
4
Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, MO 64110, USA.
5
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA.
6
Developmental Biology Program, Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, PO Box 56, Helsinki FIN-00014, Finland jernvall@fastmail.fm ophir.klein@ucsf.edu.
7
Department of Orofacial Sciences and Program in Craniofacial Biology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA jernvall@fastmail.fm ophir.klein@ucsf.edu.
8
Department of Pediatrics and Institute for Human Genetics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

Abstract

The patterning of repeated structures is a major theme in developmental biology, and the inter-relationship between spacing and size of such structures is an unresolved issue. Fungiform papillae are repeated epithelial structures that house taste buds on the anterior tongue. Here, we report that FGF signaling is a crucial regulator of fungiform papillae development. We found that mesenchymal FGF10 controls the size of the papillary area, while overall patterning remains unchanged. Our results show that FGF signaling negatively affects the extent of canonical Wnt signaling, which is the main activation pathway during fungiform papillae development; however, this effect does not occur at the level of gene transcription. Rather, our experimental data, together with computational modeling, indicate that FGF10 modulates the range of Wnt effects, likely via induction of Sostdc1 expression. We suggest that modification of the reach of Wnt signaling could be due to local changes in morphogen diffusion, representing a novel mechanism in this tissue context, and we propose that this phenomenon might be involved in a broader array of mammalian developmental processes.

KEYWORDS:

FGF; Taste papilla; Tongue; Wnt

PMID:
28506989
PMCID:
PMC5482992
DOI:
10.1242/dev.148080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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