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J Am Pharm Assoc (2003). 2017 May - Jun;57(3S):S270-S273.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.japh.2017.03.009.

Use of communication tool within electronic medical record to improve primary nonadherence.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary objective of this study was to determine if an online reminder decreased the rate of primary nonadherence for antihypertensive medications in patients seen in 2 primary care clinics in Omaha, NE. The secondary objectives were to determine if patients receiving the intervention achieved lower blood pressure values at follow-up visits and to determine if the intervention decreased the number of days between prescribing and prescription pick-up.

METHODS:

A report was generated in an electronic health record to identify patients prescribed a new antihypertensive medication from a physician at one of the primary care clinics. Patients that failed to pick up this new prescription from the pharmacy within 7 days were sent an electronic reminder via an online patient portal. A baseline comparator group was created with the use of retrospective chart reviews for the 6 months before prospective data collection. Primary nonadherence rate and blood pressure values at follow-up visits were compared between the prospective and baseline comparator groups.

RESULTS:

The primary nonadherence rate decreased from 65.5% to 22.2% when comparing the baseline and prospective groups, respectively. The mean days to prescription pick-up decreased from 24.5 to 12.56 in the baseline and prospective groups. The prospective group showed a larger decrease in systolic blood pressure (17.33 mm Hg vs. 0.75 mm Hg) and diastolic blood pressure (6.56 mm Hg vs. 2.25 mm Hg) compared with the baseline group.

CONCLUSION:

An online reminder through the electronic medical record appears to improve patient primary nonadherence, number of days between prescribing and prescription pick-up, and blood pressure measurements at follow-up visits. This research shows that an online reminder may be a valuable tool to improve patient primary adherence and health outcomes. Further research is needed with the use of a larger sample population to support any hypotheses about the effectiveness of the intervention.

PMID:
28506380
DOI:
10.1016/j.japh.2017.03.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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