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Physiol Behav. 2017 Aug 1;177:252-256. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.05.014. Epub 2017 May 11.

Sleep quality and duration are associated with performance in maximal incremental test.

Author information

1
Exercise and Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: ba.antunes2@gmail.com.
2
Exercise and Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil; Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Physical Education Department, Recife, Brazil.
3
Exercise and Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil.
4
Department of Bioscience, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Santos, SP, Brazil.
5
Sport Department, School of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
6
Exercise and Immunometabolism Research Group, Department of Physical Education, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: fabiolira@fct.unesp.br.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Inadequate sleep patterns may be considered a trigger to development of several metabolic diseases. Additionally, sleep deprivation and poor sleep quality can negatively impact performance in exercise training. However, the impact of sleep duration and sleep quality on performance during incremental maximal test performed by healthy men is unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to analyze the association between sleep pattern (duration and quality) and performance during maximal incremental test in healthy male individuals.

METHODS:

A total of 28 healthy males volunteered to take part in the study. Sleep quality, sleep duration and physical activity were subjectively assessed by questionnaires. Sleep pattern was classified by sleep duration (>7h or <7h of sleep per night) and sleep quality according to the sum of measured points and/or scores by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Incremental exercise test was performed at 35 watts for untrained subjects, 70 watts for physically active subjects and 105 watts for well-trained subjects.

RESULTS:

HRmax was correlated with sleep quality (r=0.411, p=0.030) and sleep duration (r=-0.430, p=0.022). Participants reporting good sleep quality presented higher values of Wmax, VO2max and lower values of HRmax when compared to participants with altered sleep. Regarding sleep duration, only Wmax was influenced by the amount of sleeping hours per night and this association remained significant even after adjustment by VO2max.

CONCLUSION:

Sleep duration and quality are associated, at least in part, with performance during maximal incremental test among healthy men, with losses in Wmax and HRmax. In addition, our results suggest that the relationship between sleep patterns and performance, mainly in Wmax, is independent of fitness condition.

KEYWORDS:

Anaerobic performance; Exercise; Physical activity; Sleep; Subjective sleep quality

PMID:
28502838
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.05.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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