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Virus Res. 2017 Sep 15;241:42-52. doi: 10.1016/j.virusres.2017.05.005. Epub 2017 May 11.

Insights in luteovirid structural biology guided by chemical cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry.

Author information

1
School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant Microbe Biology Section, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, NY, USA.
2
Department of Genome Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
3
USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research Unit, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, NY, USA.
4
Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, IBMP UPR 2357, F-67000 Strasbourg, France.
5
INRA-UDS, Colmar, France.
6
School of Integrative Plant Science, Plant Pathology and Plant Microbe Biology Section, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA; Boyce Thompson Institute, Ithaca, NY, USA; USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research Unit, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, Ithaca, NY, USA. Electronic address: mlc68@cornell.edu.

Abstract

Interactions among plant pathogenic viruses in the family Luteoviridae and their plant hosts and insect vectors are governed by the topology of the viral capsid, which is the sole vehicle for long distance movement of the viral genome. Previous application of a mass spectrometry-compatible cross-linker to preparations of the luteovirid Potato leafroll virus (PLRV; Luteoviridae: Polerovirus) revealed a detailed network of interactions between viral structural proteins and enabled generation of the first cross-linking guided coat protein models. In this study, we extended application of chemical cross-linking technology to the related Turnip yellows virus (TuYV; Luteoviridae: Polerovirus). Remarkably, all cross-links found between sites in the viral coat protein found for TuYV were also found in PLRV. Guided by these data, we present two models for the TuYV coat protein trimer, the basic structural unit of luteovirid virions. Additional cross-links found between the TuYV coat protein and a site in the viral protease domain suggest a possible role for the luteovirid protease in regulating the structural biology of these viruses.

PMID:
28502641
DOI:
10.1016/j.virusres.2017.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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