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Insect Biochem Mol Biol. 2017 Jul;86:9-19. doi: 10.1016/j.ibmb.2017.05.001. Epub 2017 May 11.

DINeR: Database for Insect Neuropeptide Research.

Author information

1
Institute of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
2
Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Institute of Molecular, Cell and Systems Biology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Electronic address: Julian.Dow@glasgow.ac.uk.

Abstract

Neuropeptides are responsible for regulating a variety of functions, including development, metabolism, water and ion homeostasis, and as neuromodulators in circuits of the central nervous system. Numerous neuropeptides have been identified and characterized. However, both discovery and functional characterization of neuropeptides across the massive Class Insecta has been sporadic. To leverage advances in post-genomic technologies for this rapidly growing field, insect neuroendocrinology requires a consolidated, comprehensive and standardised resource for managing neuropeptide information. The Database for Insect Neuropeptide Research (DINeR) is a web-based database-application used for search and retrieval of neuropeptide information of various insect species detailing their isoform sequences, physiological functionality and images of their receptor-binding sites, in an intuitive, accessible and user-friendly format. The curated data includes representatives of 50 well described neuropeptide families from over 400 different insect species. Approximately 4700 FASTA formatted, neuropeptide isoform amino acid sequences and over 200 records of physiological functionality have been recorded based on published literature. Also available are images of neuropeptide receptor locations. In addition, the data include comprehensive summaries for each neuropeptide family, including their function, location, known functionality, as well as cladograms, sequence alignments and logos covering most insect orders. Moreover, we have adopted a standardised nomenclature to address inconsistent classification of neuropeptides. As part of the H2020 nEUROSTRESSPEP project, the data will be actively maintained and curated, ensuring a comprehensive and standardised resource for the scientific community. DINeR is publicly available at the project website: http://www.neurostresspep.eu/diner/.

KEYWORDS:

DINeR; Database; Insect neuropeptide; Neuroendocrinology; Neuropeptide hormones; Neuropeptide signalling

PMID:
28502574
DOI:
10.1016/j.ibmb.2017.05.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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