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Clin Chim Acta. 2017 Aug;471:1-5. doi: 10.1016/j.cca.2017.05.014. Epub 2017 May 11.

Antecedents and early correlates of high and low concentrations of angiogenic proteins in extremely preterm newborns.

Author information

1
Neuroepidemiology Unit, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: alan.leviton@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
Laboratory of Genital Tract Biology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology, Brigham and Women's Hospital Boston MA, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
3
Neuroepidemiology Unit, Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
4
Department of Pediatrics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
5
Division of Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center and Boston University, Boston, MA, United States.
6
Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States; Perinatal Neuropidemiology Unit, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To identify the antecedents and very early correlates of low concentrations of angiogenic proteins in the blood of extremely preterm newborns during the first postnatal month.

METHODS:

Using multiplex immunoassays we measured the concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF), VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), placenta growth factor (PIGF), and angiopoietins 1 and 2 (Ang-1, Ang-2), as well as 21 other proteins in blood spots collected on postnatal days 1 (N=1062), 7 (N=1087), 14 (N=989), 21 (N=940) and 28 (N=880) from infants born before the 28th week of gestation. We then sought the protein-concentration correlates of concentrations in the top and bottom quartile for gestational age and day the specimen was collected.

RESULTS:

Children who were delivered for medical indications and those who were severely growth restricted were more likely than others to have low day-1 blood concentrations of VEGF, VEGF-R2, Ang-1, and PIGF. Systemic inflammation accompanied top quartile concentrations of every one of the 6 angiogenic proteins.

CONCLUSIONS:

Low day-1 concentrations of most angiogenic proteins are associated with disorders linked to placenta insufficiency/dysfunction. High concentrations, on the other hand, are associated with systemic inflammation throughout the first postnatal month.

KEYWORDS:

Angiogenesis; Cytokines; Infant, premature/blood; Inflammation; Neurotrophic factors

PMID:
28502557
DOI:
10.1016/j.cca.2017.05.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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