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Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2017 May;24(3):169-175. doi: 10.1053/j.ackd.2017.03.001.

Intravenous Contrast-Induced Nephropathy-The Rise and Fall of a Threatening Idea.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY.
2
Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, NY. Electronic address: jhn2@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) has been considered to be a cause of renal failure for over 50 years, but careful review of past and recent studies reveals the risks of CIN to be overestimated. Older studies frequently cited the use of high-osmolality contrast media, which have since been replaced by low-osmolality contrast media, which have lower risks for nephropathy. In addition, literature regarding CIN typically describes the incidence following cardiac angiography, whereas the risk of CIN from intravenous injection is much lower. Most of the early published literature also lacked appropriate control groups to compare to those that received iodinated contrast, and thus attributed rises in creatinine to intravenous contrast without considering normal creatinine fluctuations (frequent in patients with kidney disease) and other acute pathologic states such as hypotension or nephrotoxic drug administration. The aim of this paper is to review the literature detailing CIN risk, discuss why CIN risk is often overestimated and how withholding contrast can lead to misdiagnosis and delay in appropriate patient management.

KEYWORDS:

Acute Kidney Injury; Contrast-Induced Nephropathy

PMID:
28501080
DOI:
10.1053/j.ackd.2017.03.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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