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J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Nov - Dec;5(6):1617-1624. doi: 10.1016/j.jaip.2017.03.013. Epub 2017 May 9.

An Australian Consensus on Infant Feeding Guidelines to Prevent Food Allergy: Outcomes From the Australian Infant Feeding Summit.

Author information

1
South Australian Healthy and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; Discipline of Paediatrics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.
2
Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Child and Adolescent Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
Centre for Food and Allergy Research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
4
Children's Nutrition Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
5
Centre for Food and Allergy Research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
6
Allergy and Lung Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
7
Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
8
Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
9
School of Paediatrics and Child Health and Telethon KIDS Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
10
National Allergy Strategy, Balgowlah, New South Wales, Australia.
11
Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
12
Centre for Food and Allergy Research, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: katrina.allen@mcri.edu.au.

Erratum in

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infant feeding in the first postnatal year of life has an important role in an infant's risk of developing food allergy. Consumer infant feeding advice is diverse and lacks consistency.

AIM:

The Australian Infant Feeding Summit was held with the aim of achieving national consensus on the wording of guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention.

METHODS:

Two meetings were hosted by the Centre for Food and Allergy Research, the Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy, and the Australian National Allergy Strategy. The first meeting of 30 allergy researchers, clinicians, and consumers assessed the evidence. The second consensus meeting involved 46 expert stakeholders including state and federal health care agencies, consumers, and experts in allergy, infant feeding, and population health.

RESULTS:

Partner stakeholders agreed on consensus wording for infant feeding advice: CONCLUSIONS: Consensus was achieved in a context in which there is a high prevalence of food allergy. Guidelines for other countries are being updated. Provision of consistent wording related to infant feeding to reduce food allergy risk will ensure clear consumer advice.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical guidelines; Evidence-based research; Food allergy; Health education; Infant feeding; Knowledge translation

PMID:
28499774
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaip.2017.03.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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