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J Pediatr. 2017 Aug;187:225-233.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.04.005. Epub 2017 May 9.

Infant Nutritional Status and Markers of Environmental Enteric Dysfunction are Associated with Midchildhood Anthropometry and Blood Pressure in Tanzania.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
2
Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
3
African Academy for Public Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
4
Departments of Pediatrics and Child Health, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
5
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
6
Clinical Research Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
7
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; UNICEF Headquarters, New York, NY.
8
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Muhimbili University of Health Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.
9
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.
10
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA.
11
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
12
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; Departments of Pediatrics and Child Health, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Electronic address: christopher.duggan@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether growth and biomarkers of environmental enteric dysfunction in infancy are related to health outcomes in midchildhood in Tanzania.

STUDY DESIGN:

Children who participated in 2 randomized trials of micronutrient supplements in infancy were followed up in midchildhood (4.6-9.8 years of age). Anthropometry was measured at age 6 and 52 weeks in both trials, and blood samples were available from children at 6 weeks and 6 months from 1 trial. Linear regression was used for height-for-age z-score, body mass index-for-age z-score, and weight for age z-score, and blood pressure analyses; log-binomial models were used to estimate risk of overweight, obesity, and stunting in midchildhood.

RESULTS:

One hundred thirteen children were followed-up. Length-for-age z-score at 6 weeks and delta length-for-age z-score from 6 to 52 weeks were associated independently and positively with height-for-age z-score and inversely associated with stunting in midchildhood. Delta weight-for-length and weight-for-age z-score were also positively associated with midchildhood height-for-age z-score. The 6-week and delta weight-for-length z-scores were associated independently and positively with midchildhood body mass index-for-age z-score and overweight, as was the 6-week and delta weight-for-age z-score. Delta length-for-age z-score was also associated with an increased risk of overweight in midchildhood. Body mass index-for-age z-score in midchildhood was associated positively with systolic blood pressure. Serum anti-flagellin IgA concentration at 6 weeks was also associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood.

CONCLUSIONS:

Anthropometry at 6 weeks and growth in infancy independently predict size in midchildhood, while anti-flagellin IgA, a biomarker of environmental enteric dysfunction, in early infancy is associated with increased blood pressure in midchildhood. Interventions in early life should focus on optimizing linear growth while minimizing excess weight gain and environmental enteric dysfunction.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00197730 and NCT00421668.

KEYWORDS:

child health; growth; nutrition transition

PMID:
28499715
PMCID:
PMC5533170
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.04.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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