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J Pediatr Surg. 2017 Oct;52(10):1571-1575. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2017.04.021. Epub 2017 May 1.

Long-term outcomes of oesophageal atresia without or with proximal tracheooesophageal fistula - Gross types A and B.

Author information

1
Section of Paediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: antti.koivusalo@hus.fi.
2
Section of Paediatric Surgery, Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Because of an extended gap between esophageal pouches a variety of methods are employed to treat oesophageal atresia (OA) without (type A) or with (type B) proximal tracheooesophageal fistula. This retrospective observational study describes their single centre long-term outcomes from 1947 to 2014.

METHODS:

Of 693 patients treated for OA 68 (9.7%) had type A (n=58, 8.3%) or B (n=10, 1.4%). Hospital records were reviewed. Main outcome measures were survival and oral intake.

RESULTS:

Nine (13%) patients had early and 10 (15%) delayed primary anastomosis, 30 (44%) underwent reconstruction including colonic interposition (n=13), reversed gastric tube (n=11) and jejunum interposition (n=6), whereas19 (28%) had died without a definite repair. Median follow up was 35 (interquartile range, 7.4-40) years. Thirty-one (63%) of 49 patients with definitive repair survived long term. Survival was 22% for early and 80% for delayed primary anastomosis, 57% for colon interposition, 82% for gastric tube and 84% for jejunum interposition. Gastrooesophageal reflux was most common after gastric tube (80%), dysphagia after colon interposition (50%), and 3 (60%) of 5 survivors with jejunum interposition had permanent feeding ostomy because of neurological disorder. Endoscopic follow-up disclosed no oesophageal cancer or dysplasia. Repair in the most recent patients from 1985 to 2014 (n=14) included delayed primary anastomosis (n=7), jejunum interposition (n=6) and gastric tube (n=1) with 93% long-term survival.

CONCLUSION:

Morbidity among long-term survivors of type A or B OA is high. With modern management survival is, however, excellent and patients without neurological disorder achieve full oral intake either after primary anastomosis or reconstruction.

LEVELS OF EVIDENCE:

IV.

KEYWORDS:

Colon interposition; Gastric tube; Jejunum interposition; Oesophageal atresia; Primary repair

PMID:
28499713
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2017.04.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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