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Paediatr Anaesth. 2017 Jul;27(7):742-751. doi: 10.1111/pan.13139. Epub 2017 May 11.

Single and multiple sevoflurane exposures during pregnancy and offspring behavior in mice.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea.
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon, South Korea.
5
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, South Korea.
6
Department of Medical Science, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, South Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The second trimester is a period of neurogenesis and neuronal migration, which can be affected by exposure to anesthetics. Studies also suggest that multiple exposures may have a greater impact on neurodevelopment.

AIM:

We investigated whether in utero single or multiple exposures to anesthetics caused long-term behavior changes.

METHODS:

Pregnant mice were randomly divided into four groups on gestational day 14 (GD 14). Mice in the Control × 1 group were exposed to 100% oxygen for 150 min. Mice in the Sevo × 1 group were also exposed to 100% oxygen for 150 min, except that 2.5% sevoflurane was added during the first 120 min. Mice in the Control × 3 and Sevo × 3 group were identically treated as Control × 1 and Sevo × 1 group for three consecutive days, respectively (GD 14-16). Behavioral tests were performed only with the male offspring at the age of 2-4 months. Synaptic plasticity was also compared by inducing long-term potentiation in acute hippocampal slices.

RESULTS:

Single or multiple sevoflurane exposures in pregnant mice during the second trimester did not cause long-lasting behavioral consequences or changes in long-term synaptic plasticity of their offspring.

CONCLUSION:

Our study suggests that neither single nor multiple exposures of mice to sevoflurane during the fetal developmental period induces long-term behavioral dysfunctions or affects long-term synaptic plasticity. Additional studies focusing on early stages of neurodevelopment are necessary to confirm the effects of sevoflurane exposure during pregnancy.

KEYWORDS:

anesthesia; fetus; neurodevelopmental disorders; sevoflurane

PMID:
28497474
DOI:
10.1111/pan.13139
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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