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Sci Rep. 2017 May 11;7(1):1754. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-01918-7.

TaPIMP2, a pathogen-induced MYB protein in wheat, contributes to host resistance to common root rot caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana.

Author information

1
The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China.
2
The National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, 100081, China. zhangzengyan@caas.cn.

Abstract

MYB transcription factors (TFs) have been implicated in various biology processes in model plants. However, functions of the great majority of MYB TFs in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have not been characterized. The soil-borne fungal pathogens Bipolaris sorokiniana and Rhizoctonia cerealis are the causal agents of important destructive diseases of wheat. Here, the TaPIMP2 gene, encoding a pathogen-induced MYB protein in wheat, was isolated through comparative transcriptomic analysis, and its defensive role was studied. TaPIMP2 was proved to localize in nuclei. TaPIMP2 responded in a different extent and speed upon infections of B. sorokiniana or R. cerealis. TaPIMP2 displayed different expression patterns after exogenous application of phytohormones, including abscisic acid, ethylene, and salicylic acid. Silencing of TaPIMP2 repressed resistance of wheat cultivar Yangmai 6 to B. sorokiniana, but did not alter resistance of wheat line CI12633 to R. cerealis. TaPIMP2 overexpression significantly improved resistance to B. sorokiniana rather than R. cerealis in transgenic wheat. Moreover, TaPIMP2 positively modulated the expression of pathogenesis-related genes, including PR1a, PR2, PR5, and PR10. Collectively, TaPIMP2 positively contributes to wheat resistance to B. sorokiniana possibly through regulating the expression of defense-related genes, and TaPIMP2 plays distinct roles in defense responses to different fungal infection.

PMID:
28496196
PMCID:
PMC5431884
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-01918-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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