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Sci Rep. 2017 May 11;7(1):1731. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-01792-3.

The association between psychological stress and miscarriage: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, No.1 Xueshi Road, Hangzhou, 310006, Zhejiang, P. R. China.
2
Institute of Women's Health, University College London, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK.
3
Department of Statistical Science, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
4
Library Services, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
5
EBSCO Health for UK North & Ireland at EBSCO Information Services, 4th Floor Kingmaker House, Station Road, New Barnet, EN5 1NZ, UK.
6
Psychology Department, School of Social Sciences, City University London, Northampton Square, London, EC1V 0HB, UK.
7
Institute of Women's Health, University College London, Rowland Hill Street, London, NW3 2PF, UK. p.hardiman@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

This systematic review and meta-analysis was designed to investigate whether maternal psychological stress and recent life events are associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. A literature search was conducted to identify studies reporting miscarriage in women with and without history of exposure to psychological stress (the only exposure considered). The search produced 1978 studies; 8 studies were suitable for analysis. A meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model with effect sizes weighted by the sampling variance. The risk of miscarriage was significantly higher in women with a history of exposure to psychological stress (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.19-1.70). These findings remained after controlling for study type (cohort and nested case-control study OR 1.33 95% CI 1.14-1.54), exposure types (work stress OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.10-1.47), types of controls included (live birth OR 2.82 95% CI: 1.64-4.86). We found no evidence that publication bias or study heterogeneity significantly influenced the results. Our finding provides the most robust evidence to date, that prior psychological stress is harmful to women in early pregnancy.

PMID:
28496110
PMCID:
PMC5431920
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-01792-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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