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Science. 2017 May 26;356(6340). pii: eaal3321. doi: 10.1126/science.aal3321. Epub 2017 May 11.

A subcellular map of the human proteome.

Author information

1
Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Cambridge Centre for Proteomics, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QR, UK.
3
Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EH, UK.
4
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
5
Computational Proteomics Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge CB2 1QR, UK.
6
Department of Proteomics, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
7
Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
8
Science for Life Laboratory, School of Biotechnology, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. mathias.uhlen@scilifelab.se emma.lundberg@scilifelab.se.

Abstract

Resolving the spatial distribution of the human proteome at a subcellular level can greatly increase our understanding of human biology and disease. Here we present a comprehensive image-based map of subcellular protein distribution, the Cell Atlas, built by integrating transcriptomics and antibody-based immunofluorescence microscopy with validation by mass spectrometry. Mapping the in situ localization of 12,003 human proteins at a single-cell level to 30 subcellular structures enabled the definition of the proteomes of 13 major organelles. Exploration of the proteomes revealed single-cell variations in abundance or spatial distribution and localization of about half of the proteins to multiple compartments. This subcellular map can be used to refine existing protein-protein interaction networks and provides an important resource to deconvolute the highly complex architecture of the human cell.

PMID:
28495876
DOI:
10.1126/science.aal3321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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