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FEBS Lett. 1988 Dec 19;242(1):101-5.

Halothane, an inhalation anesthetic, activates protein kinase C and superoxide generation by neutrophils.

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1
Department of Anesthesiology, Kochi Medical School, Japan.

Abstract

The rate of superoxide generation of guinea pig intraperitoneal neutrophils by a chemotactic peptide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) was increased by 2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1,-trifluoroethane (halothane), an inhalation anesthetic. This increase was inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (H-7), a specific inhibitor of Ca2+- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC). Halothane was found to significantly activate partially purified PKC. The activation required phosphatidylserine (PS) and Ca2+. Dioleoylglycerol- or TPA-activated PKC activity was further increased by halothane. The cytoplasmic proteins of guinea pig neutrophils phosphorylated by halothane-activated PKC were similar to those phosphorylated by PMA-activated PKC. The phosphorylation of a 48 kDa protein, a phosphorylated protein required for NADPH oxidase activation, was also increased by halothane. These data suggest that the increase of superoxide production by halothane is correlated with its activation of PKC.

PMID:
2849554
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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