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Biomed Environ Sci. 2017 Apr;30(4):235-243. doi: 10.3967/bes2017.033.

Impact of Smoking Status on Lipoprotein Subfractions: Data from an Untreated Chinese Cohort.

Author information

1
Division of Dyslipidemia, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Diseases, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100037, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Cigarette smoking is one of the established risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, however, its impact on lipids is not completely understood, especially in the Chinese population. Therefore, this study evaluated the impact of smoking status (non, former, and current smoking) on the distribution of lipoprotein subfractions in untreated patients with angina-like chest pain.

METHODS:

A total of 877 patients were consecutively enrolled and divided into nonsmoking (n = 518), former smoking (n = 103), and current smoking (n = 256) groups. Both low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and HDL-C) subfractions were measured using the Quantimetrix Lipoprint System. The distributions of lipoprotein subfractions were evaluated among the groups.

RESULTS:

Compared with nonsmoking subjects, the current smoking group had significantly lower large/medium HDL-C (both P < 0.001) concentration and large HDL subfraction percentage but higher small HDL-C and medium LDL-C concentrations as well as medium LDL subfraction percentage. Importantly, former smoking subjects showed elevated levels of large HDL-C concentration, large HDL particle percentage, and mean LDL particle size and attenuation in small HDL/LDL percentages and small LDL-C concentration, but these levels did not reach the optimal status compared with those of the non-smoking group (data not shown).

CONCLUSION:

Smoking has an adverse impact on the lipoprotein subfractions, presented as lower large HDL particles besides higher small HDL and medium LDL particles, whereas smoking cessation could reverse these change to a certain degree.

KEYWORDS:

Chinese; Lipoprotein subfractions; Smoking; Smoking cessation

PMID:
28494833
DOI:
10.3967/bes2017.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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