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J Immigr Minor Health. 2017 May 10. doi: 10.1007/s10903-017-0578-4. [Epub ahead of print]

Cardiovascular Disease & Cancer Risk Among South Asians: Impact of Sociocultural Influences on Lifestyle and Behavior.

Author information

1
Department of General Internal Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA.
2
Bureau of Environmental Surveillance and Policy, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY, USA.
3
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine & Center for Health Equity and Quality Research, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USA.
4
Life Sciences Research and Surveys, Gerson Lehrman Group, New York, NY, USA.
5
Bureau of Environmental Disease and Injury Prevention, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York, NY, USA.
6
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Kemah Palms Recovery, Kemah, TX, USA.
8
South Asian Heart Center, El Camino Hospital, Mountain View, CA, USA.
9
Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Department of Health and Kinesiology, College of Education and Human Development, Center for the Study of Health Disparities, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA.
11
Asian Human Services Family Health Center, Inc., Chicago, IL, USA.
12
Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
13
United Nations, Delhi, India.
14
Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 485 Lexington Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY, 10017, USA.
15
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.
16
Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
17
Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 485 Lexington Avenue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY, 10017, USA. ganyf@mskcc.org.
18
Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ganyf@mskcc.org.
19
Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. ganyf@mskcc.org.
20
Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. ganyf@mskcc.org.

Abstract

A comprehensive literature review revealed cultural beliefs, societal obligations, and gender roles within the South Asian community to be indirect contributors to the health of South Asian immigrants (SAIs). Health professionals need to increase their work with SAI communities to change less beneficial cultural elements such as misconceptions about health and exercise, and lack of communication when using alternative medicines. Community engaged efforts and continuing medical education are both needed to improve the health of the South Asian immigrant population in a culturally appropriate manner.

KEYWORDS:

Behaviour; Cancer risk; Cardiovascular disease risk; Culture; Lifestyle; South Asian

PMID:
28493115
DOI:
10.1007/s10903-017-0578-4
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