Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2017 May 10;12(5):e0176020. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176020. eCollection 2017.

Human perception of electrical stimulation on the surface of somatosensory cortex.

Hiremath SV1,2,3, Tyler-Kabara EC1,4,5,6, Wheeler JJ7, Moran DW7, Gaunt RA1,4, Collinger JL1,2,4,8, Foldes ST1,2,8,9, Weber DJ1,2,4, Chen W1,10, Boninger ML1,4,6,8, Wang W1,2,4,11,12.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
2
Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
4
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
5
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
6
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
7
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America.
8
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
9
Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, United States of America.
10
Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.
11
Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
12
Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America.

Abstract

Recent advancement in electrocorticography (ECoG)-based brain-computer interface technology has sparked a new interest in providing somatosensory feedback using ECoG electrodes, i.e., cortical surface electrodes. We conducted a 28-day study of cortical surface stimulation in an individual with arm paralysis due to brachial plexus injury to examine the sensation produced by electrical stimulation of the somatosensory cortex. A high-density ECoG grid was implanted over the somatosensory and motor cortices. Stimulation through cortical surface electrodes over the somatosensory cortex successfully elicited arm and hand sensations in our participant with chronic paralysis. There were three key findings. First, the intensity of perceived sensation increased monotonically with both pulse amplitude and pulse frequency. Second, changing pulse width changed the type of sensation based on qualitative description provided by the human participant. Third, the participant could distinguish between stimulation applied to two neighboring cortical surface electrodes, 4.5 mm center-to-center distance, for three out of seven electrode pairs tested. Taken together, we found that it was possible to modulate sensation intensity, sensation type, and evoke sensations across a range of locations from the fingers to the upper arm using different stimulation electrodes even in an individual with chronic impairment of somatosensory function. These three features are essential to provide effective somatosensory feedback for neuroprosthetic applications.

PMID:
28489913
PMCID:
PMC5425101
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center