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Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Aug;50(8):863-872. doi: 10.1002/eat.22723. Epub 2017 May 10.

Enhanced cognitive behavioral therapy for eating disorders adapted for a group setting.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia.
2
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, United Kingdom.
3
The Eating Disorders Service, Maudsley Hospital, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This randomized control trial is an evaluation of the effectiveness of enhanced cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT-E) for eating disorders adapted for a group setting. The study aimed to examine the effects of group CBT-E on eating disorder psychopathology and additional maintaining pathology.

METHOD:

A transdiagnostic sample of individuals with eating disorders with a BMI ≥ 18 kg/m2 (N = 40) were randomized to an immediate-start or delayed-start condition so as to compare therapeutic effects of group CBT-E with a waitlist control. Global Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) scores, BMI, and measures of Clinical Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, Interpersonal Difficulties, and Mood Intolerance were measured across the 8-week control period, throughout the group treatment and at 3-months post-treatment.

RESULTS:

Over 70% of those who entered the trial completed treatment. The first eight weeks of group CBT-E were more effective at reducing Global EDE-Q scores than no treatment (waitlist control). By post-treatment, good outcome (a Global EDE-Q within 1 SD of Australian community norms plus BMI ≥ 18.5) was achieved by 67.9% of treatment completers and 66.7% of the total sample. Symptom abstinence within the previous month was reported by 14.3% of treatment completers and 10.3% of the total sample. Significant reductions in Clinical Perfectionism, Self-Esteem, Interpersonal Difficulties, and Mood Intolerance were also observed.

DISCUSSION:

This study demonstrated that a group version of CBT-E can be effective at reducing eating disorder psychopathology in a transdiagnostic sample of individuals with eating disorders. Group CBT-E could provide a means of increasing availability of evidence-based treatment for eating disorders.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive behaviour therapy; eating disorders; group treatment; transdiagnostic; treatment

PMID:
28489288
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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