Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Psychol. 2017 Apr 25;8:579. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00579. eCollection 2017.

Binge Eating Disorder (BED) in Relation to Addictive Behaviors and Personality Risk Factors.

Author information

1
Kinesiology & Health Science, York University, TorontoON, Canada.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ONCanada.
3
Department of Psychology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John'sNF, Canada.

Abstract

While there is good evidence that binge eating disorder (BED) is linked to higher-than-expected use of a broad range of addictive behaviors, mechanisms underlying this association are not well understood. Using a mediation-analytical approach with three age- and gender-matched groups - overweight/obese adults with (n = 42) and without (n = 104) BED, and normal-weight control participants (n = 73) - we tested the hypothesis that adults with BED would engage in more addictive behaviors and have higher scores on a personality-risk index than the two control groups. We also anticipated that the relationship between BED and addictive behaviors would be mediated by a high-risk personality profile. The predicted mediation effect was strongly supported. Contrary to expectation, BED participants did not engage in more addictive behaviors or have higher personality-risk scores than their weight-matched counterparts. However, both overweight/obese groups did have significantly higher scores than the normal-weight group. The relationships among personality risk, elevated body mass index (BMI), and addictive behaviors have important clinical implications, especially for treatments that target psycho-behavioral intervention for compulsive overeating and substance-use disorders.

KEYWORDS:

addictive behaviors; binge eating disorder; personality risk

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center