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Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 Jul;105:456-474. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.05.003. Epub 2017 May 6.

Potential contribution of insecticide exposure and development of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.
2
Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 01003, MA, USA.
3
Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA. Electronic address: ypark@foodsci.umass.edu.

Abstract

The introduction of insecticides has greatly improved agricultural productivity and human nutrition; however, the wide use of insecticides has also sparked growing concern over their health impacts. Increased rate of cancers, neurodegenerative disorders, reproductive dysfunction, birth defects, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular diseases and aging have been linked with insecticide exposure. Meanwhile, a growing body of evidence is suggesting that exposure to insecticides can also potentiate the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the relationship between insecticide exposure and development of obesity and type 2 diabetes using epidemiological and rodent animal studies, including potential mechanisms. The evidence as a whole suggests that exposure to insecticides is linked to increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Glucose metabolism; Insecticide; Obesity; Type 2 diabetes

PMID:
28487232
PMCID:
PMC5518693
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2017.05.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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