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BMC Med. 2017 May 9;15(1):97. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0862-0.

Habitual coffee consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity: gene-diet interaction analyses in three US prospective studies.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA.
2
Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
3
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
6
Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Center for Research and Innovation in Translational Nutrition and Health (CIINT), Universidad Hispanoamericana, San Jose, Costa Rica.
8
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA, 70112, USA. lqi1@tulane.edu.
10
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. lqi1@tulane.edu.
11
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. lqi1@tulane.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Whether habitual coffee consumption interacts with the genetic predisposition to obesity in relation to body mass index (BMI) and obesity is unknown.

METHODS:

We analyzed the interactions between genetic predisposition and habitual coffee consumption in relation to BMI and obesity risk in 5116 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), in 9841 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), and in 5648 women from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI). The genetic risk score was calculated based on 77 BMI-associated loci. Coffee consumption was examined prospectively in relation to BMI.

RESULTS:

The genetic association with BMI was attenuated among participants with higher consumption of coffee than among those with lower consumption in the HPFS (P interaction  = 0.023) and NHS (P interaction  = 0.039); similar results were replicated in the WHI (P interaction  = 0.044). In the combined data of all cohorts, differences in BMI per increment of 10-risk allele were 1.38 (standard error (SE), 0.28), 1.02 (SE, 0.10), and 0.95 (SE, 0.12) kg/m2 for coffee consumption of < 1, 1-3 and > 3 cup(s)/day, respectively (P interaction  < 0.001). Such interaction was partly due to slightly higher BMI with higher coffee consumption among participants at lower genetic risk and slightly lower BMI with higher coffee consumption among those at higher genetic risk. Each increment of 10-risk allele was associated with 78% (95% confidence interval (CI), 59-99%), 48% (95% CI, 36-62%), and 43% (95% CI, 28-59%) increased risk for obesity across these subgroups of coffee consumption (P interaction  = 0.008). From another perspective, differences in BMI per increment of 1 cup/day coffee consumption were 0.02 (SE, 0.09), -0.02 (SE, 0.04), and -0.14 (SE, 0.04) kg/m2 across tertiles of the genetic risk score.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher coffee consumption might attenuate the genetic associations with BMI and obesity risk, and individuals with greater genetic predisposition to obesity appeared to have lower BMI associated with higher coffee consumption.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Coffee; Gene-diet interaction; Genetic predisposition; Obesity

PMID:
28486942
PMCID:
PMC5424298
DOI:
10.1186/s12916-017-0862-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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