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PLoS One. 2017 May 9;12(5):e0176549. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176549. eCollection 2017.

Association between a history of mycobacterial infection and the risk of newly diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome: A nationwide, population-based case-control study.

Chao WC1,2,3, Lin CH1, Liao TL1,4, Chen YM1,4,5,6, Chen DY4,5,6,7,8, Chen HH1,4,5,6,7,9.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Research, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
2
Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
3
Department of Business Administration, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan.
4
Institute of Biomedical Science and Rong Hsing Research Center for Translational Medicine, Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan.
5
Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
6
School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.
7
School of Medicine, Chung-Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.
8
Department of Medical Education, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
9
Institute of Public Health and Community Medicine Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To address the association between a history of tuberculosis (TB) or nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection and the risk of newly diagnosed Sjögren's syndrome (SS).

METHODS:

Using a nationwide, population-based, claims dataset, and after excluding those who had rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, we identified 5,751 newly diagnosed SS cases during 2007-2012, and compared them to 86,265 non-SS controls matched (1:15) for age, sex, and the year of first SS diagnosis date. The association between the risk of incident SS and a history of mycobacterial infection, including TB and NTM, was quantified by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression analysis after adjustment for Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) and bronchiectasis.

RESULTS:

The mean age was 55±14 years, and the proportion of female gender was 87.8% in both newly diagnosed SS cases andnon-SS controls. An association was observed between NTM infection (OR, 11.24; 95% CI, 2.37-53.24) and incident SS, but not between TB infection and incident SS (OR, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.97-1.71) after adjustment for CCI and bronchiectasis. The association between NTM and SS risk was remarkably strong among those aged between 45 and 65 years (OR, 39.24; 95% CI, 3.97-387.75) and those without bronchiectasis (OR, 39.98; 95% CI, 3.83-376.92).

CONCLUSION:

The study reveals a significant association of newly diagnosed SS with a history NTM infection, especially among individuals aged 40-65 years or those without bronchiectasis.

PMID:
28486537
PMCID:
PMC5423582
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176549
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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