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J Comp Eff Res. 2017 May 9. doi: 10.2217/cer-2016-0060. [Epub ahead of print]

Patient-related beliefs and adherence toward their medications among the adult hypertensive outpatients in Tanzania.

Author information

1
School of Pharmacy, Catholic University of Health & Allied Science, PO Box 1464 Mwanza, Tanzania.
2
Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania.
3
Medicine Usage in South Africa (MUSA), Faculty of Health Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
4
Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, UK.
5
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Health Economics Centre, Liverpool University Management School, Liverpool, UK.
7
Department of Pharmacology & Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.
8
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana.

Abstract

AIM:

Hypertension is a leading global health problem requiring lifelong treatment. However, adherence to antihypertensive medicines is a problem, greater among developing countries. Consequently, there is a need to determine current adherence rates and their associations among developing countries to plan future initiatives.

MATERIALS & METHODS:

Cross-sectional study among adult outpatients with essential hypertension in Tanzania. Predesigned questionnaires were used to gather information on adherence rates and patient-related beliefs. The main outcome measure was adherence.

RESULTS:

A total of 180 participants were included, with females making up 65%. High-adherence rates were seen in 54% of the patients. Patients' belief about their medication and its necessity was higher in the high adherent group and concerns about their medicines and their necessity were higher in the low adherent group. Conclusion & recommendations: Adherence rates were low compared with a suggested level ≥80%. Educational initiatives are needed to address knowledge and concerns with hypertension to improve future outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Tanzania; adherence; antihypertensives; beliefs; hypertension

PMID:
28485175
DOI:
10.2217/cer-2016-0060

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