Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuropsychol Rev. 2017 Jun;27(2):147-157. doi: 10.1007/s11065-017-9346-4. Epub 2017 May 8.

Historical Perspectives on Ancient Greek Derived "a" Prefixed Nomenclature for Acquired Neurocognitive Impairment.

Author information

1
Department of Psychological Science, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, 1201 W. University Drive, Edinburg, TX, 78541, USA. drgdrg13@yahoo.com.

Abstract

Distinct forms of acquired neurocognitive impairment are often described by "a" prefixed terms that derive from ancient Greek (and in one case Latin). Two modern English language neurological and neuropsychological reference books were searched to identify 17 such terms in contemporary usage: amnesia, akinesia, ataxia, aphasia, agraphia, anosmia, apraxia, athetosis, ageusia, achromatopsia, agnosia, alexia, amusia, anomia, anarthria, anosognosia, and acalculia. These were traced to their initial association with acquired neurocognitive impairment in German, English, and French language medical publications from the late 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries (1770 through 1920). Some of these terms (e.g., agnosia) were used in ancient Greek, although not associated with neurocognitive impairment. The remainder constitute novel semantically plausible (e.g., anosmia) and unclear (e.g., alexia) formulations. In the localizationist thinking of the time, neurocognition was conceived as being organized within specialized "centers" in specific locations connected by pathways within the brain.

KEYWORDS:

History of clinical neuropsychology; History of neurocognition; Medical terminology; Neuropsychological impairment; Nineteenth century neurology

PMID:
28484905
DOI:
10.1007/s11065-017-9346-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center