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Sci Rep. 2017 May 8;7(1):1533. doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-01724-1.

Pattern analysis of laser-tattoo interactions for picosecond- and nanosecond-domain 1,064-nm neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers in tissue-mimicking phantom.

Ahn KJ1, Zheng Z2,3, Kwon TR4,5, Kim BJ4,5, Lee HS6, Cho SB7,8,9.

Author information

1
Department of Science Education, Jeju National University, Jeju, Korea.
2
Department of Dermatology, Yanbian University Hospital, Yanji, China.
3
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology Research Center, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea.
4
Department of Dermatology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
5
Department of Medicine, Graduate School, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, Korea.
6
Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology Research Center, International St. Mary's Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. drsbcho@gmail.com.
8
Department of Dermatology, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. drsbcho@gmail.com.
9
Kangskin Sillim Dermatology Clinic, Seoul, Korea. drsbcho@gmail.com.

Abstract

During laser treatment for tattoo removal, pigment chromophores absorb laser energy, resulting in fragmentation of the ink particles via selective photothermolysis. The present study aimed to outline macroscopic laser-tattoo interactions in tissue-mimicking (TM) phantoms treated with picosecond- and nanosecond-domain lasers. Additionally, high-speed cinematographs were captured to visualize time-dependent tattoo-tissue interactions, from laser irradiation to the formation of photothermal and photoacoustic injury zones (PIZs). In all experimental settings using the nanosecond or picosecond laser, tattoo pigments fragmented into coarse particles after a single laser pulse, and further disintegrated into smaller particles that dispersed toward the boundaries of PIZs after repetitive delivery of laser energy. Particles fractured by picosecond treatment were more evenly dispersed throughout PIZs than those fractured by nanosecond treatment. Additionally, picosecond-then-picosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-picosecond treatment) induced greater disintegration of tattoo particles within PIZs than picosecond-then-nanosecond laser treatment (5-pass-picosecond treatment + 5-pass-nanosecond treatment). High-speed cinematography recorded the formation of PIZs after repeated reflection and propagation of acoustic waves over hundreds of microseconds to a few milliseconds. The present data may be of use in predicting three-dimensional laser-tattoo interactions and associated reactions in surrounding tissue.

PMID:
28484226
PMCID:
PMC5431496
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-01724-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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