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Microb Cell Fact. 2017 May 8;16(1):79. doi: 10.1186/s12934-017-0691-z.

Beneficial effects on host energy metabolism of short-chain fatty acids and vitamins produced by commensal and probiotic bacteria.

Author information

1
Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina.
2
Commensals and Probiotics-Host Interactions Laboratory, Micalis Institute, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, 78350, Jouy-en-Josas, France.
3
Merck-Médication Familiale, BP 77035, 21070, Dijon, France.
4
Commensals and Probiotics-Host Interactions Laboratory, Micalis Institute, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, 78350, Jouy-en-Josas, France. philippe.langella@inra.fr.

Abstract

The aim of this review is to summarize the effect in host energy metabolism of the production of B group vitamins and short chain fatty acids (SCFA) by commensal, food-grade and probiotic bacteria, which are also actors of the mammalian nutrition. The mechanisms of how these microbial end products, produced by these bacterial strains, act on energy metabolism will be discussed. We will show that these vitamins and SCFA producing bacteria could be used as tools to recover energy intakes by either optimizing ATP production from foods or by the fermentation of certain fibers in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Original data are also presented in this work where SCFA (acetate, butyrate and propionate) and B group vitamins (riboflavin, folate and thiamine) production was determined for selected probiotic bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Energy metabolism; Microbiota; Short-chain fatty acids; Vitamins

PMID:
28482838
PMCID:
PMC5423028
DOI:
10.1186/s12934-017-0691-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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