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Sleep. 2017 Aug 1;40(8). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsx079.

A Four-Session Sleep Intervention Program Improves Sleep for Older Adult Day Health Care Participants: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Author information

1
Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, North Hills, CA.
2
David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.
3
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC.
4
Health Services Research & Development, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC.
5
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA.
6
Department of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.

Abstract

Study Objective:

To test the effectiveness of a 4-week behavioral Sleep Intervention Program (SIP: sleep compression, modified stimulus control, and sleep hygiene) compared to a 4-week information-only control (IC) among older adults attending a VA Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) program in a double-blind, randomized, clinical trial.

Methods:

Forty-two individuals (mean age: 77 years, 93% male) enrolled in a VA ADHC program were randomized to receive SIP or IC. All completed in-person sleep and health assessments at baseline, post-treatment and 4-months follow-up that included 3 days/nights of wrist actigraphy, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), and the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Mixed repeated measures analysis was used to compare sleep outcomes at post-treatment and 4-months follow-up, with baseline values as covariates.

Results:

SIP participants (n = 21) showed significant improvement on actigraphy sleep efficiency (p = .007), number of nighttime awakenings (p = .016), and minutes awake at night (p = .001) at post-treatment, compared to IC participants (n = 21). Benefits were slightly attenuated but remained significant at 4-month follow-up (all p's < .05). There were no differences in total sleep time between groups. There was significant improvement on PSQI factor 3 (daily disturbances) at 4-month follow-up (p = .016), but no differences were observed between SIP and IC on other PSQI components or ISI scores at post-treatment or 4-month follow-up.

Conclusions:

A short behavioral sleep intervention may have important benefits in improving objectively measured sleep in older adults participating in ADHC. Future studies are needed to study implementation of this intervention into routine clinical care within ADHC.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01259401.

KEYWORDS:

adult day health care; aging; behavioral interventions; sleep; veterans

PMID:
28482053
PMCID:
PMC5804980
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsx079
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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