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Food Chem Toxicol. 2017 Jul;105:387-397. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2017.05.004. Epub 2017 May 4.

Arsenic metabolism and one-carbon metabolism at low-moderate arsenic exposure: Evidence from the Strong Heart Study.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. Electronic address: mjones47@jhu.edu.
2
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: mvg7@cumc.columbia.edu.
3
Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: mg3749@cumc.columbia.edu.
4
Kidney Institute and Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medical University Hospital and College of Medicine, China Medical University, No.91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan; Big Data Center, China Medical University Hospital and China Medical University, No. 91, Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan. Electronic address: chinchik@gmail.com.
5
Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc., 118 S. Willow St, Eagle Butte, SD 57625, USA. Electronic address: lbest@restel.com.
6
Missouri Breaks Industries Research, Inc., 118 S. Willow St, Eagle Butte, SD 57625, USA. Electronic address: joseph.yracheta@mbiri.com.
7
Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Universitätsplatz 1/1, 8010 Graz, Austria. Electronic address: kevin.francesconi@uni-graz.at.
8
Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Universitätsplatz 1/1, 8010 Graz, Austria. Electronic address: walter.goessler@uni-graz.at.
9
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address: yasmin.mossavar-rahmani@einstein.yu.edu.
10
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: mh2825@cumc.columbia.edu.
11
MedStar Health Research Institute, 6525 Belcrest Rd #700, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA; Georgetown-Howard Universities Center for Clinical and Translational Science, 4000 Reservoir Road, Washington, DC 20007, USA. Electronic address: jason.umans@gmail.com.
12
Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Health Sciences Bldg, F-262 Box 357236, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: amfretts@u.washington.edu.
13
Department of Environmental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Department, 615 N. Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA; Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 W 168th St, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: an2737@cumc.columbia.edu.

Abstract

B-vitamins involved in one-carbon metabolism (OCM) can affect arsenic metabolism efficiency in highly arsenic exposed, undernourished populations. We evaluated whether dietary intake of OCM nutrients (including vitamins B2, B6, folate (B9), and B12) was associated with arsenic metabolism in a more nourished population exposed to lower arsenic than previously studied. Dietary intake of OCM nutrients and urine arsenic was evaluated in 405 participants from the Strong Heart Study. Arsenic exposure was measured as the sum of iAs, monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsenate (DMA) in urine. Arsenic metabolism was measured as the individual percentages of each metabolite over their sum (iAs%, MMA%, DMA%). In adjusted models, increasing intake of vitamins B2 and B6 was associated with modest but significant decreases in iAs% and MMA% and increases in DMA%. A significant interaction was found between high folate and B6 with enhanced arsenic metabolism efficiency. Our findings suggest OCM nutrients may influence arsenic metabolism in populations with moderate arsenic exposure. Stronger and independent associations were observed with B2 and B6, vitamins previously understudied in relation to arsenic. Research is needed to evaluate whether targeting B-vitamin intake can serve as a strategy for the prevention of arsenic-related health effects at low-moderate arsenic exposure.

KEYWORDS:

Arsenic metabolism; B-vitamins; Dietary intake; One-carbon metabolism; Strong Heart Study

PMID:
28479390
PMCID:
PMC5515076
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2017.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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