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Neurol Sci. 2017 Aug;38(8):1505-1508. doi: 10.1007/s10072-017-2961-2. Epub 2017 May 6.

Shifting from constant-voltage to constant-current in Parkinson's disease patients with chronic stimulation.

Author information

1
NeuroCenter, Humanitas Research Hospital, via Alessandro Manzoni, 56, Rozzano - Milano, 20089, Italy. paolo.amami@humanitas.it.
2
Department of Neurology, Catholic University, Milan, Italy. paolo.amami@humanitas.it.
3
Department of Neurology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
4
Department of Neurosurgery, Carlo Besta Neurological Institute, Milan, Italy.
5
Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Hospital das Clìnicas de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
6
NeuroCenter, Humanitas Research Hospital, via Alessandro Manzoni, 56, Rozzano - Milano, 20089, Italy.
7
Department of Neurology, Catholic University, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

The study aimed to evaluate safety and efficacy of shifting stimulation settings from constant-voltage (CV) to constant-current (CC) programming in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and chronic subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS). Twenty PD patients with chronic STN DBS set in CV programming were shifted to CC and followed for 3 months; the other stimulation settings and the medication regimen remained unchanged. Side effects, motor, non-motor, executive functions, and impedance were assessed at baseline and during follow-up. No adverse events were observed at time of shifting or during CC stimulation. Motor and non-motor measures remained unchanged at follow-up despite impedance decreased. Compared to baseline, inhibition processes improved at follow-up. The shifting strategy was well tolerated and the clinical outcome was maintained with no need to adjust stimulation settings or medications notwithstanding a decrease of impedance. Improvement of inhibition processes is a finding which needed further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Constant current; Deep brain stimulation; Executive functions; Parkinson’s disease; Subthalamic nucleus

PMID:
28478496
DOI:
10.1007/s10072-017-2961-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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