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J Dairy Sci. 2017 Jul;100(7):5774-5781. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-12394. Epub 2017 May 3.

Colostrum immunoglobulin G concentration of multiparous Jersey cows at first and second milking is associated with parity, colostrum yield, and time of first milking, and can be estimated with Brix refractometry.

Author information

1
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, 18830 Road 112, Tulare, CA 93274; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616. Electronic address: nsilvadelrio@ucdavis.edu.
2
Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, 18830 Road 112, Tulare, CA 93274; Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616.
3
Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad CEU Cardenal Herrera, Valencia, Spain 46115.
4
DairyExperts Inc., Tulare, CA 93274.
5
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616; Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of California, Davis 95616; Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis 95616.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate colostrum IgG concentration harvested at first and second milking from multiparous Jersey cows, the dam's lactation number, colostrum yield, and time of first milking. In addition, we validated the use of a Brix refractometer to estimate IgG concentration in colostrum from multiparous Jersey cows using radial immunodiffusion as the reference method. Colostrum samples and total weight of colostrum harvested at first (n = 134) and second (n = 68) milking were collected from 134 multiparous Jersey cows housed in a California herd. Fresh colostrum samples were analyzed for IgG concentration with Brix refractometry and frozen samples by radial immunodiffusion. A total of 90.4 and 42.7% of the samples from first and second milking met industry standards of quality for IgG concentration (>50 g/L). Second and third lactation cows had similar colostrum IgG concentration but lower than cows on their fourth and greater lactation. At second milking, 56.4% of cows on their fourth or greater lactation had colostrum IgG concentrations >50 g/L. When colostrum yield increased from low (<3 kg), medium (3 to 6 kg), to high (>6 kg), IgG concentration decreased. Higher IgG concentration was observed on colostrum harvested at <6 h (short) versus 6 to 11 h (medium) after calving. However, IgG concentration in colostrum harvested after 11 h (long) was similar to that harvested at short and medium time. Readings of %Brix were highly correlated with IgG at first (r = 0.81) and second (r = 0.77) milking. The best Brix threshold to identify colostrum from first milking with >50 IgG g/L was 20.9% based on logit equations with Youden's index criterion and 18.0% based on accuracy criterion. For colostrum harvested at second milking, similar Brix thresholds were obtained, 19.2 and 19.0%, regardless of whether Youden's index or accuracy was used as the selection criterion. Our results indicate that the dam's lactation number, colostrum yield, and time of first milking relative to calving are associated with IgG concentration in colostrum from multiparous Jersey cows. Second milking colostrum from mature Jersey cows should be evaluated to extend colostrum supply on dairies especially during times of shortage. Readings of %Brix can be used to rapidly estimate IgG concentration in Jersey colostrum harvested at first and second milking.

KEYWORDS:

Brix refractometry; Jersey; colostrum; radial immunodiffusion

PMID:
28478013
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2016-12394
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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