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J Dairy Sci. 2017 Jul;100(7):5212-5216. doi: 10.3168/jds.2016-12308. Epub 2017 May 3.

Short communication: Production of cottage cheese fortified with vitamin D.

Author information

1
St-Hyacinthe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 3600 Casavant Boulevard West, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 8E2, Canada; Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels, Centre de Recherche en Sciences et Technologie du Lait, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada.
2
St-Hyacinthe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 3600 Casavant Boulevard West, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 8E2, Canada.
3
Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels, Centre de Recherche en Sciences et Technologie du Lait, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada.
4
St-Hyacinthe Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, 3600 Casavant Boulevard West, St-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 8E2, Canada; Institut sur la Nutrition et les Aliments Fonctionnels, Centre de Recherche en Sciences et Technologie du Lait, Université Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6, Canada. Electronic address: daniel.st-gelais@agr.gc.ca.

Abstract

The availability of alternative food products fortified with vitamin D could help decrease the percentage of the population with vitamin D deficiency. The objective of this study was to fortify cheese with vitamin D. Cottage cheese was selected because its manufacture allows for the addition of vitamin D after the draining step without any loss of the vitamin in whey. Cream containing vitamin D (145 IU/g of cream) was mixed with the fresh cheese curds, resulting in a final concentration of 51 IU/g of cheese. Unfortified cottage cheese was used as a control. As expected, the cottage cheese was fortified without any loss of vitamin D in the cheese whey. The vitamin D added to cream was not affected by homogenization or pasteurization treatments. In cottage cheese, the vitamin D concentration remained stable during 3 weeks of storage at 4°C. Compared with the control cheese, the cheese fortified with vitamin D showed no effects of fortification on cheese characteristics or sensory properties. Cottage cheese could be a new source of vitamin D or an alternative to fortified drinking milk.

KEYWORDS:

cottage cheese; stability; storage; vitamin D

PMID:
28478001
DOI:
10.3168/jds.2016-12308
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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