Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2017 Jun;40(2):321-334. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2017.01.009. Epub 2017 Mar 31.

Mental Health Aspects of Intimate Partner Violence.

Author information

1
University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, EN-7-229, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Toronto General Hospital Research Institute, 200 Elizabeth Street, 7EN-229, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Centre for Mental Health, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, 7EN-229, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada. Electronic address: donna.stewart@uhn.ca.
2
University of Toronto, 200 Elizabeth Street, EN-7-229, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4, Canada; Women's College Hospital and Research Institute, 76 Grenville Street, Room 7234, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1B2, Canada.

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) is common worldwide and occurs in more than one-third of American women and psychiatric patients. As well as physical injuries, it may cause mental health sequelae, such as depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, psychosis, inability to trust others, self-harm, and a host of psychosomatic conditions, that may be referred to psychiatrists. It is imperative that psychiatrists know the risk factors, how to assist disclosure of IPV, and how to safely respond. Psychiatrists must know the best evidence-based management of IPV and its mental health sequelae to best assist patients who have been exposed to IPV.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse effects; IPV identification and disclosure; IPV mental Health clinical management; IPV prevalence; Intimate partner violence (IPV); Risk factors

PMID:
28477656
DOI:
10.1016/j.psc.2017.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center