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Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2017 Jun;40(2):255-266. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2017.01.003. Epub 2017 Mar 6.

Binge Eating Disorder.

Author information

1
Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA. Electronic address: anna.guerdjikova@lindnercenter.org.
2
Lindner Center of HOPE, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, 4075 Old Western Row Road, Mason, OH 45040, USA.

Abstract

Binge eating disorder (BED) is the most common eating disorder and an important public health problem. Lifetime prevalence of BED in the United States is 2.6%. In contrast to other eating disorders, the female to male ratio in BED is more balanced. BED co-occurs with a plethora of psychiatric disorders, most commonly mood and anxiety disorders. BED is also associated with obesity and its numerous complications. Although BED is similar in men and women in presentation and treatment outcomes, there are some key neurobiological differences that should be taken in consideration when personalizing treatment.

KEYWORDS:

Binge eating disorder; Eating dysregulation; Female binge eating; Gender; Sex differences; Treatment

PMID:
28477651
DOI:
10.1016/j.psc.2017.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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