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Psychiatry Res. 2017 Aug;254:251-257. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.051. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Electrophysiological correlates of visual backward masking in high schizotypic personality traits participants.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. Electronic address: ophelie.favrod@epfl.ch.
2
Faculté des Sciences Sociales et Politiques, Institut de Psychologie, Bâtiment Geopolis, Lausanne, Switzerland.
3
Vision Research Laboratory, Beritashvili Centre of Experimental Biomedicine, Tbilisi, Georgia; Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia.
4
Institute of Cognitive Neurosciences, Agricultural University of Georgia, Tbilisi, Georgia; Department of Psychiatry, Tbilisi State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia.
5
Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland.
6
Laboratory of Psychophysics, Brain Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland; Centre de Recherche Cerveau et Cognition, Université de Toulouse, UPS, CNRS, 31052 Toulouse, France.

Abstract

Visual backward masking is strongly deteriorated in patients with schizophrenia. Masking deficits are associated with strongly reduced amplitudes of the global field power in the EEG. Healthy participants who scored high in cognitive disorganization (a schizotypic trait) were impaired in backward masking compared to participants who scored low. Here, we show that the global field power is also reduced in healthy participants scoring high (n=25) as compared to low (n=20) in cognitive disorganization, though quantitatively less pronounced than in patients (n=10). These results point to similar mechanisms underlying visual backward masking deficits along the schizophrenia spectrum.

PMID:
28477548
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2017.04.051
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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