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Acta Paediatr. 2017 Aug;106(8):1331-1335. doi: 10.1111/apa.13907.

Television or unrestricted, unmonitored internet access in the bedroom and body mass index in youth athletes.

Author information

1
The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention, Waltham, MA, USA.
2
Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
4
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To correlate television or unrestricted, unmonitored Internet access in room of sleep with body mass index (BMI).

METHODS:

Cross-sectional study of athletes ≤19 years who underwent an injury prevention evaluation. Independent variables included proportion of athletes categorised as overweight or obese who answered positively to American Academy of Pediatrics recommended questions: (i) Do you have a TV in the room where you sleep? (ii) Do you have unrestricted, unmonitored access to the Internet in the room where you sleep?

RESULTS:

555 athletes; 324 female; mean age 13.83 ± 2.60. Athletes with a TV in their room of sleep had higher BMI (22.73 vs. 20.54; p < 0.001), slept less hours/week (7.65 vs. 8.12; p = 0.003) and were more likely to be overweight/obese (40.32% vs. 25.52%; p = 0.022). Athletes with unrestricted, unmonitored Internet access in the room of sleep had a higher BMI (21.68 vs. 19.83; p < 0.001), slept fewer hours/week (7.58 vs. 8.60; p < 0.001) and per/weekend (9.00 vs. 9.37; p < 0.001). After adjusting for age and gender, having a TV in the room of sleep remained significantly associated with BMI and WHO criteria for overweight/obesity.

CONCLUSION:

Athletes with television in their room of sleep were more likely to have higher BMI and be overweight or obese.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent health; Anticipatory guidance; Media; Obesity; Overweight; Sedentary behaviours

PMID:
28477427
DOI:
10.1111/apa.13907
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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