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Am J Prev Med. 2017 Sep;53(3):392-395. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2017.02.024. Epub 2017 May 1.

Cervical Cancer Screening and Incidence by Age: Unmet Needs Near and After the Stopping Age for Screening.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: mxw5@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Leading professional organizations recommend cervical cancer screening for average-risk women aged 21-65 years. For average-risk women aged >65 years, routine screening may be discontinued if "adequate" screening with negative results is documented. Screening is recommended after age 65 years for women who do not meet adequate prior screening criteria or are at special risk.

METHODS:

Authors examined the most recent cervical cancer incidence data from two federal cancer surveillance programs for all women by age and race, corrected for hysterectomy status. The 2013 and 2015 National Health Interview Surveys were analyzed in 2016 to examine the proportion of women aged 41-70 years without a hysterectomy who reported that they never had a Pap test or that their most recent Pap test was >5 years ago (not recently screened).

RESULTS:

The incidence rate for cervical cancer among older women, corrected for hysterectomy status, did not decline until age ≥85 years. The proportion not recently screened increased with age, from 12.1% for women aged 41-45 years to 18.4% for women aged 61-65 years.

CONCLUSIONS:

Even among women within the recommended age range for routine screening, many are not up to date, and a substantial number of women approach the "stopping" age for cervical cancer screening without an adequate prior screening history. Efforts are needed to reach women who have not been adequately screened, including women aged >65 years, to prevent invasive cervical cancer cases and deaths among older women.

PMID:
28473240
PMCID:
PMC5821231
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2017.02.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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