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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2018 Feb;85:102-116. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.04.023. Epub 2017 May 1.

Perinatal selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medication (SSRI) effects on social behaviors, neurodevelopment and the epigenome.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA.
2
Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia.
3
Department of Psychology, Colgate University, Hamilton, NY, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Laboratory of Translational Neuroscience, Center of Mental Health, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany.
5
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, B.C. Children's and Women's Hospitals, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute, Vancouver, Canada.
6
Research Institute in Health, Environment and Occupation, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1085, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France.
7
Research Institute in Health, Environment and Occupation, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale U1085, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France. Electronic address: j.pawluski@gmail.com.

Abstract

Recent research has linked early life exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications (SSRIs) to modifications of social behaviors in children. Serotonin is a key regulator of neurodevelopment, social behaviors and mental health, and with the growing use of SSRIs to treat maternal affective disorders during the perinatal period, questions have been raised about the benefits and risks of perinatal SSRI exposure on the developing child. This review will highlight how perinatal SSRIs affect maternal care and neurodevelopmental outcomes related to social affiliative behaviors in offspring; such as play behaviors, social interactions, reproductive behaviors, and maternal care of the next generation. We will also review how early life exposure to SSRIs can alter related neurobiology, and the epigenome. Both clinical research and findings from animal models will be discussed. Understanding the impact of perinatal SSRIs on neurobehavioral outcomes will improve the health and well-being of subsequent generations.

KEYWORDS:

Antidepressant; Development; Maternal anxiety; Maternal care; Maternal stress; Offspring; Perinatal depression; Play behavior; Pregnancy; Reproductive behavior; SSRI; Serotonin; Sex differences; Social interaction; Stress

PMID:
28472631
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2017.04.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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