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Eur J Public Health. 2018 Feb 1;28(1):167-172. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckx060.

Association between dietary inflammatory index, and cause-specific mortality in the MONICA/KORA Augsburg Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
3
Institute of Epidemiology II, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg, Germany.
4
Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
5
Department of Internal Medicine II - Cardiology, University Hospital Ulm, Ulm Medical Center, Ulm, Germany.
6
DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

Background:

Chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are well-established causes of disability and premature death. Dietary components have been implicated in the etiology of these chronic diseases.

Methods:

We examined the ability of the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DIITM) to predict all-cause, coronary heart disease (CHD), CVD and cancer mortality and incident CHD in the MONICA-KORA Cohort Studies. DII scores were computed from baseline 7-day dietary records in this cohort of 1297 men, who were aged 45-64 years when enrolled. During the follow-up period, 551 total (155 CHD, 244 CVD and 175 cancer-related deaths) and 213 validated incident CHD events were identified through mortality record linkage and active follow-up. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated between DII scores and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) for the endpoints described above.

Results:

DII scores were significantly positively correlated with CRP (P value <0.0001). Positive associations were noted between DII and all-cause mortality (HRQ4vsQ1: 1.41; 95%CI 1.04-1.90; P-trend = 0.007) and incident CHD (HRQ4vsQ1: 1.83; 95%CI 1.12-3.01; P-trend = 0.008). These associations were attenuated after further adjustment for smoking status, but remained significant for all-cause mortality. When stratified by smoking status, DII was associated with all-cause and cancer mortality among ex-smokers, in the absence of significant heterogeneity.

Conclusion:

These results indicate that a pro-inflammatory diet as expressed by higher DII scores is associated with all-cause mortality. This association was more pronounced among ex-smokers in whom a significant association with cancer mortality was observed.

PMID:
28472442
PMCID:
PMC5881699
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/ckx060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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