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PLoS One. 2017 May 4;12(5):e0176833. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176833. eCollection 2017.

Associations between MRI features versus knee pain severity and progression: Data from the Vancouver Longitudinal Study of Early Knee Osteoarthritis.

Author information

1
Arthritis Research Canada, Richmond, BC, Canada.
2
Radiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, United States of America.
3
Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
4
Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
5
School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane St. Lucia, QLD, Australia.
6
School of Population & Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
7
Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine associations between features of osteoarthritis (OA) on MRI and knee pain severity and knee pain progression.

DESIGN:

Baseline, 3.3- and 7.5-year assessments were performed for 122 subjects with baseline knee pain (age 40-79), sample-weighted for population (with knee pain) representativeness. MRIs were scored for: osteophytes (0:absent to 3:large); cartilage (0:normal to 4:full thickness defect; 0/1 collapsed); subchondral sclerosis (0:none to 3:>50% of site), subchondral cyst (0:absent to 3:severe), bone marrow lesions (0:none to 3:≥50% of site); and meniscus (0:normal to 3:maceration/resection), in 6-8 regions each. Per feature, scores were averaged across regions. Effusion/synovitis (0:absent to 3:severe) was analyzed as ≥2 vs. <2. Linear models predicted WOMAC knee pain severity (0-100), and binary models predicted 10+ (minimum perceptible clinical improvement [MPCI]) and 20+ (minimum clinically important difference [MCID]) increases. Models were adjusted for age, sex, BMI (and follow-up time for longitudinal models).

RESULTS:

Pain severity was associated with osteophytes (7.17 per unit average; 95% CI = 3.19, 11.15) and subchondral sclerosis (11.03; 0.68, 21.39). MPCI-based pain increase was associated with osteophytes (odds ratio per unit average 3.20; 1.36, 7.55), subchondral sclerosis (5.69; 1.06, 30.44), meniscal damage (1.68; 1.08, 2.61) and effusion/synovitis ≥2 (2.25; 1.07, 4.71). MCID-based pain increase was associated with osteophytes (3.79; 1.41, 10.20) and cartilage defects (2.42; 1.24, 4.74).

CONCLUSIONS:

Of the features investigated, only osteophytes were consistently associated with pain cross-sectionally and longitudinally in all models. This suggests an important role of bone in early knee osteoarthritis.

PMID:
28472071
PMCID:
PMC5417516
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176833
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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