Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS One. 2017 May 4;12(5):e0176617. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176617. eCollection 2017.

Impact of illicit opioid use on T cell subsets among HIV-infected adults.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States of America.
2
Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS, Yale University School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, United States of America.
3
Department of Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States of America.
4
Department of Biostatistics, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.
5
Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Vermont, Colchester, VT, United States of America.
6
Data Coordinating Center, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.
7
First Pavlov State Medical University of St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
8
Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, United States of America.
9
Nashville Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Nashville, TN, United States of America.
10
St.-Petersburg Bekhterev Research Psychoneurological Institute, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.
11
Department of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, United States of America.
12
Department of Medicine, Section of General Internal Medicine, Clinical Addiction Research and Education Unit, Boston University School of Medicine/Boston Medical Center, Boston, MA, United States of America.
13
Department of Community Health Sciences, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States of America.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Opioids have immunosuppressive properties, yet opioid effects on T cell abnormalities consistent with the immune risk phenotype among HIV-infected individuals are understudied.

METHODS:

To assess associations between illicit opioid use and T cell characteristics (CD4/CD8 ratio, memory profiles based on CD45RO and CD28 expression, and senescence based on CD57 expression), we conducted an exploratory cross-sectional analysis of Russia ARCH, a cohort of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-infected individuals recruited 11/2012 to 10/2014 in St. Petersburg, Russia. The main independent variable was past 30 day illicit opioid use (yes vs. no). Secondary analyses evaluated none (0 days), intermittent (1 to 7 days), and persistent (8 to 30 days) opioid use. Outcomes were determined with flow cytometry. Analyses were conducted using linear regression models.

RESULTS:

Among 186 participants, 38% reported any illicit opioid use (18% intermittent and 20% persistent). Any illicit opioid use was not significantly associated with T cell characteristics. Intermittent opioid use appeared to be associated with decreased memory CD8+ T cells proportion (CD45RO+CD45RA- CD8+ T cells: adjusted mean difference [AMD] [95% CI] = -6.15 [-11.50, -0.79], p = 0.02) and borderline significant increased senescent T cells (%CD57+ of total CD28-CD8+ T cells (AMD [95% CI] = 7.70 [-0.06, 15.46], p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Among ART-naïve HIV-infected Russians, any illicit opioid use was not significantly associated with T cell abnormalities although intermittent illicit opioid use may be associated with CD8 T cell abnormalities. Longitudinal studies are warranted to confirm these findings given increased risk of infections and comorbidities seen among HIV-infected individuals with illicit opioid use.

PMID:
28472064
PMCID:
PMC5417591
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0176617
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center