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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2017 Sep;36(9):908-910. doi: 10.1097/INF.0000000000001626.

Concomitant Bacterial Meningitis in Infants With Urinary Tract Infection.

Author information

1
From the *Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio; †Sections of Pediatric Emergency Medicine and Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas; ‡Division of Emergency Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; §Sections of Pediatric Emergency Medicine and Gastroenterology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; ¶Departments of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island; ‖Division of Emergency Medicine, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego, California and Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Diego; **Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; ††Division of Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington; ‡‡Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California; §§Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Cardinal Glennon Children's Hospital, and ¶¶Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri; and ‖‖Division of Infectious Disease, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio.
2
Pediatric Emergency Medicine Collaborative Research Committee (PEM CRC) HSV Study Group

Abstract

To determine age-stratified prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants ≤60 days with a urinary tract infection, we performed a 23-center, retrospective study of 1737 infants with urinary tract infection. Concomitant bacterial meningitis was rare, but more common in infants 0-28 days of age [0.9%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.4%-1.9%) compared with infants 29-60 days of age (0.2%; 95% CI: 0%-0.8%).

PMID:
28472006
DOI:
10.1097/INF.0000000000001626
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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