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Open Biol. 2017 May;7(5). pii: 170057. doi: 10.1098/rsob.170057.

The early response during the interaction of fungal phytopathogen and host plant.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Wheat and Maize Crop Science/Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Grain Crops, College of Life Science, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, People's Republic of China.
2
State Key Laboratory of Wheat and Maize Crop Science/Collaborative Innovation Center of Henan Grain Crops, College of Life Science, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou 450002, People's Republic of China wmzheng@henau.edu.cn.

Abstract

Plants can be infected by a variety of pathogens, most of which can cause severe economic losses. The plants resist the invasion of pathogens via the innate or acquired immune system for surviving biotic stress. The associations between plants and pathogens are sophisticated beyond imaging and the interactions between them can occur at a very early stage after their touching each other. A number of researchers in the past decade have shown that many biochemical events appeared even as early as 5 min after their touching for plant disease resistance response. The early molecular interactions of plants and pathogens are likely to involve protein phosphorylation, ion fluxes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other signalling transduction. Here, we reviewed the recent progress in the study for molecular interaction response of fungal pathogens and host plant at the early infection stage, which included many economically important crop fungal pathogens such as cereal rust fungi, tomato Cladosporium fulvum, rice blast and so on. By dissecting the earlier infection stage of the diseases, the avirulent/virulent genes of pathogen or resistance genes of plant could be defined more clearly and accurately, which would undoubtedly facilitate fungal pathogenesis study and resistant crop breeding.

KEYWORDS:

avirulent genes; early infection; fungal pathogens; host plant; molecular interactions; resistance genes

PMID:
28469008
PMCID:
PMC5451545
DOI:
10.1098/rsob.170057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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