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Cell Metab. 2017 May 2;25(5):1045-1053.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.04.009.

FGF21 Is a Sugar-Induced Hormone Associated with Sweet Intake and Preference in Humans.

Author information

1
Section for Metabolic Imaging and Liver Metabolism, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism and Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
2
Section of Metabolic Genetics, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
3
Centre of Inflammation and Metabolism and Physical Activity Research, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark; Section of Metabolic Receptology, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Centre for Health, Capital Region of Denmark, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark.
5
Section for Metabolic Imaging and Liver Metabolism, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Section of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
7
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, 1958 Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Department of Pharmacology and Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA.
9
School of Sport, Exercise, and Rehabilitation Sciences, Institute of Metabolism and Systems Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.
10
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Centre for Health, Capital Region of Denmark, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Clinical Experimental Research, Rigshospitalet, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
11
Research Centre for Prevention and Health, Centre for Health, Capital Region of Denmark, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 1014 Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, 9100 Aalborg, Denmark.
12
Section of Metabolic Genetics, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
13
Section of Metabolic Genetics, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, 5000 Odense, Denmark.
14
Section for Metabolic Imaging and Liver Metabolism, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: gillum@sund.ku.dk.
15
Section of Metabolic Genetics, Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200 Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: niels.grarup@sund.ku.dk.

Abstract

The liking and selective ingestion of palatable foods-including sweets-is biologically controlled, and dysfunction of this regulation may promote unhealthy eating, obesity, and disease. The hepatokine fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) reduces sweet consumption in rodents and primates, whereas knockout of Fgf21 increases sugar consumption in mice. To investigate the relevance of these findings in humans, we genotyped variants in the FGF21 locus in participants from the Danish Inter99 cohort (n = 6,514) and examined their relationship with a detailed range of food and ingestive behaviors. This revealed statistically significant associations between FGF21 rs838133 and increased consumption of candy, as well as nominal associations with increased alcohol intake and daily smoking. Moreover, in a separate clinical study, plasma FGF21 levels increased acutely after oral sucrose ingestion and were elevated in fasted sweet-disliking individuals. These data suggest the liver may secrete hormones that influence eating behavior.

KEYWORDS:

FGF21; fibroblast growth factor 21; food preference; genetic association study; human; macronutrient preference; reward seeking; sucrose preference; sugar appetite

Comment in

PMID:
28467924
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2017.04.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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